• Armed Conflict Survey

    Chapter 5: South Asia

    05 May 2016. 

    Afghanistan
    India (Assam)
    India (Manipur)
    India (Nagaland)
    India (Naxalites)
    India–Pakistan (Kashmir)
    Pakistan

  • Armed Conflict Survey

    Chapter 4: Sub-Saharan Africa

    05 May 2016. 

    Central African Republic
    Democratic Republic of the Congo
    Ethiopia
    Nigeria (Boko Haram)
    Nigeria (Delta Region)
    Somalia
    South Sudan
    Sudan (Darfur)

  • Armed Conflict Survey

    Chapter 6: Asia-Pacific

    05 May 2016. 

    China (Xinjiang)
    Myanmar
    Philippines (ASG)
    Philippines (MILF)
    Philippines (NPA)
    Southern Thailand

  • Armed Conflict Survey

    Chapter 7: Europe and Eurasia

    05 May 2016. 

    Armenia–Azerbaijan (Nagorno-Karabakh)
    Central Asia
    Russia (North Caucasus)
    Ukraine

  • Armed Conflict Survey

    Chapter 3: Middle East

    05 May 2016. 

    Egypt (Sinai)
    Iraq
    Israel–Palestine
    Lebanon–Hizbullah–Syria
    Libya
    Mali (The Sahel)
    Syria
    Turkey (PKK)
    Yemen

  • Armed Conflict Survey

    Chapter 8: Latin America

    05 May 2016. 

    Central America (Northern Triangle)
    Colombia
    Mexico

  • Armed Conflict Survey

    Chapter 1, Part IV: The Shifting Roles of Female Combatants

    05 May 2016. 

    Throughout 2015, the international media paid great attention to female combatants of all kinds: glamourised Kurdish fighters; those taking up arms for the Islamic State (also known as ISIS or ISIL), including suicide bombers and the group’s all-female brigade, al-Khansaa; and Hayat Boumedienne and Hasna Ait Boulahcen, who worked alongside male jihadists in France in January and November respectively.

  • Armed Conflict Survey

    Chapter 1, Part III: Measuring the Threat from Foreign Fighters

    05 May 2016. 

    On 13 November 2015, teams of attackers linked to jihadist group the Islamic State (also known as ISIS or ISIL) killed 130 people in Paris. Several of the attackers, including the mastermind, had fought in Syria, and their operation appeared to realise the fears of counter-terrorism officials in the United States and Europe: that the Syrian war would prove an incubator of terrorism on the scale of pre-9/11 Afghanistan. Yet not every war in the Muslim world that draws Western recruits produces international terrorism when these foreign fighters return home. Indeed, some, such as the conflicts in Somalia and Mali, have led to little terrorism ‘bleedout’.

  • Armed Conflict Survey

    Chapter 1, Part II: The Political Economy of Violent Conflict

    05 May 2016. 

    With violent conflict rapidly changing the strategic landscape in many parts of the world, new perspectives are required to inform analysis and policy responses. This essay focuses on how a political-economy perspective could provide policy¬≠makers with a means to better understand the organisational aspects of armed groups and the behaviour and motives of their members, often vaguely labelled ‘terrorists’, ‘warlords’ or ‘criminals’. The practical value of this perspective rests on delineating the functions of violence, the characteristics of armed groups and the financing of conflict – all of which help to develop a better understanding of conflict dynamics in fluid and turbulent circumstances. These perspectives can build on over two decades of work on the political economy of violent conflict.

  • Events

    The Armed Conflict Survey 2016: Media Launch

    05 May 2016. 

    Media Launch
    Arundel House, London
    Thursday 5 May 2016
    9-9.30am BST Informal breakfast reception
    9.30-10.30am BST IISS Director-General and Chief Executive Dr John Chipman's remarks and Q&A with the panel

Welcome to the IISS’ new search feature: here you will find content from the Institute on the topic/region selected. Click ‘advanced search options’ to filter by content type, date, related topics and/or experts.

To see your previous purchases and favourites, log-in to My IISS.