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US Foreign Policy & Transatlantic Affairs

US Foreign Policy & Transatlantic Affairs

Exploring how economic worries about military overstretch are altering the United States' global posture, asking whether a more consolidated US posture might be effected, and analysing the implications for US allies and rivals.

Expert: Dr Dana Allin

Dana Allin

Senior Fellow for US Foreign Policy and Transatlantic Affairs; Editor of Survival

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US–Saudi relations: between friction and accommodation

US–Saudi relations have always been transactional, driven by US strategic interests and Saudi threat perceptions. After decades of relative stability, greater US energy independence and differences over the Iran nuclear deal, the Arab Spring and Syria have caused their interests and policies to diverge.

  • Events

    The 2016 Elections: Implications for US Foreign Policy and Transatlantic Relations

    26 September 2016. 

    Discussion Meeting
    Dr Jackson Janes, President, American Institute for Contemporary German Studies, Johns Hopkins University
    Arundel House, London
    Monday 26 September 2016, 12.30–1.30PM BST

  • Events

    The proliferation of terrorist watch lists in the US

    22 September 2016. 

    Discussion Meeting
    Dr Jeffrey Kahn, Professor of Law, Dedman School of Law, Southern Methodist University
    Arundel House, London
    Thursday 22 September 2016, 12.30–1.30PM BST

  • IISS Voices

    Jonathan Stevenson: Explaining US policy stasis in Syria

    12 September 2016.  The fragile hope is that the deal tentatively struck last week by John Kerry and Sergey Lavrov for the US and Russia to coordinate counter-jihadist operations and restrain opposition and regime military activity, respectively, will produce a durable ceasefire in Syria and re-energise political talks. As Jonathan Stevenson explains, prospects for success are dubious.

  • IISS Voices

    From the archive: Clinton’s running mate, Tim Kaine, offers his views on military intervention

    24 July 2016.  In a candid address to the IISS Manama Dialogue in 2013, Hillary Clinton’s running mate, Tim Kaine, identified four key elements that must be addressed if policymakers are to convince a sceptical public of the need for military engagement. The speech offers a fascinating insight into his personal views on military intervention, and how he would seek to win over his public if elected to office.

  • Events

    Our Separate Ways: The Struggle for the Future of the US-Israel Alliance

    21 June 2016. 

    IISS–Americas Book Launch
    Dana H. Allin, Senior Fellow for US Foreign Policy and Transatlantic Affairs, IISS
    Steven N. Simon, Former Senior Director for Middle Eastern and North African Affairs, National Security Council
    IISS–Americas, Washington DC
    Tuesday 21 June 2016, 10–11AM EDT

  • Events

    Our Separate Ways: The Struggle for the Future of the US-Israel Alliance

    14 June 2016. 

    IISS–Americas New York Book Launch
    Dana H. Allin, Senior Fellow for US Foreign Policy and Transatlantic Affairs, IISS
    Steven N. Simon, Former Senior Director for Middle Eastern and North African Affairs, National Security Council
    The Cornell Club, New York
    Tuesday 14 June 2016, 6.30–7.30PM EDT

  • IISS Voices

    Jonathan Stevenson: Ratcheting up US military involvement in Syria and Iraq

    21 April 2016.  The US Defense Department has announced increases in the number of special-operations forces to be deployed in Syria, and enhancements to their missions in Iraq. Jonathan Stevenson analyses the strategic and political implications of this move.

  • Events

    IISS Survival Seminar: Donald Trump's America

    18 April 2016. 

    Survival Seminar
    Dr Dana Allin, Senior Fellow and Editor of Survival, IISS
    Arundel House, London
    Monday 18 April 2016, 12.30–1.30PM BST

  • Strategic Comments

    US–Saudi relations: between friction and accommodation

    18 March 2016. 

    US–Saudi relations have always been transactional, driven by US strategic interests and Saudi threat perceptions. After decades of relative stability, greater US energy independence and differences over the Iran nuclear deal, the Arab Spring and Syria have caused their interests and policies to diverge. 

  • Politics and Strategy

    Dana H. Allin: Out of New Hampshire, and out of control?

    10 February 2016.  In late 2010, the writer Peter Beinart compared the expanding Tea Party conquest of the Republican Party to what had happened to Democrats after Vice President Hubert Humphrey lost narrowly to Richard Nixon in 1968. ‘[B]etween 1968 and 1972, grassroots activists—many of them incubated in the anti-war movement—took over the Democratic Party, state by state. In 1970, activists rewrote Michigan’s party platform so that it advocated reparations to North Vietnam...

Jonathan Stevenson

Ratcheting up US military involvement in Syria and Iraq

The US Defense Department announced increases in the number of special-operations forces to be deployed in Syria, and enhancements to their missions in Iraq. Jonathan Stevenson analyses the strategic and political implications of this move.