US President Donald Trump's new ‘Afghanistan and South Asia’ policy identifies Pakistan and India as key players but ignores or minimises other influential regional actors with vested interests in Afghanistan, including China, Russia, Iran and Saudi Arabia. Unless the US better integrates their interests, any regional approach to Afghanistan's stability and security is unlikely to succeed.

With his announcement of a new ‘Afghanistan and South Asia’ strategy last month, US President Donald Trump aimed to supply a much-needed wider regional approach towards the future of Afghanistan. The strategy explicitly identifies Pakistan and India as key players in relation to Afghanistan. But it also ignores or minimises other influential non-South Asian regional players with vested interests in Afghanistan, most notably China, Russia, Iran and Saudi Arabia. The failure of this new US policy to fully consider the interests of these countries is conspicuous and problematic. Although in some areas they have differing priorities or competing interests in relation to one another or the United States, unless the US embraces and to some extent integrates their interests, any regional approach to Afghanistan’s stability and security is unlikely to succeed.

Online Access & Digital Download £5.00
Product variations
Online Access & Digital Download £5.00 (Inc VAT if applicable)
Back to content list

IISS Manama Dialogue 2017

India in the Gulf

IISS Senior Fellow for South Asia Rahul Roy-Chaudhury speaks at the 2017 IISS Manama Dialogue in Bahrain.

About the conference

The 11th IISS South Asia Security Conference, in partnership with the Near East South Asia Center for Strategic Studies at the US National Defense University, took place in Muscat, Oman, on 13–15 October 2017.