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Azaz, 23 April 2013. A mosque damaged in the fighting in Syria (Photo: ICRC)

Armed Conflict

With facts and figures on global conflicts, this IISS research programme also offers extensive analysis on the changing character of armed conflict

Expert: Anastasia Voronkova

Dr Anastasia Voronkova

Editor, Armed Conflict Survey; Research Fellow for Armed Conflict and Armed Conflict Database

New publication

Armed Conflict Survey 2016

The Armed Conflict Survey provides in-depth analysis of the political, military and humanitarian dimensions of all major armed conflicts, as well as data on fatalities, refugees and internally displaced persons. Compiled by the IISS, publisher of The Military Balance, it is the standard reference work on contemporary conflict.

  • Events

    The IISS Manama Dialogue 2016

    09 December 2016. 

    12th Regional Security Summit
    Ritz-Carlton, Bahrain Hotel & Spa, Manama
    9-11 December 2016

  • Events

    Transitioning from Colombia’s Long War

    27 July 2016. 

    Discussion Meeting
    HE Néstor Osorio Londoño, Colombia’s Ambassador to the United Kingdom
    Dr Samir Puri, Lecturer, King's College London; author of upcoming Adelphi book Fighting and Negotiating with Armed Groups
    Antônio Sampaio, Research Associate for Security and Development, IISS
    Gwen Burnyeat, Wolfson Scholar, PhD Student, University College London
    Arundel House, London
    Wednesday 27 July 2016, 12–1.30PM BST

  • ACD Insight

    Economic development is no panacea for tackling insurgency in India’s Red Corridor

    26 July 2016.  Reports of human rights abuses by security services could undermine counter-insurgency efforts in east India

  • IISS Voices

    Christopher Shay: Economic development is no panacea for tackling insurgency in India’s Red Corridor

    26 July 2016.  Reports of human rights abuses by security services could undermine counter-insurgency efforts in east India

  • Strategic Comments

    Turkey: the attempted coup and its troubling aftermath

    21 July 2016. 

    The military coup attempted in Turkey on 15 July 2016 fizzled out quickly. But President Tayyip Erdogan has accused a political rival, exiled Islamic preacher Fethullah Gulen, and his followers of engineering the coup without substantiation, and is using it as a pretext to purge the government, judiciary and military. This reaction could lead to sustained domestic instability that would strain Turkey's international relations, exacerbate its democratic deficit and damage its social fabric.

  • Expert Commentary

    New York Times: Why the US military can't fix Syria

    13 July 2016.  By Jonathan Stevenson, Senior Fellow for US Defence and Editor of Strategic Comments, and Steven Simon The State Department “dissent channel” memo on the United States’ policy in Syria, leaked last month, is just the latest expression of a widespread belief in and out of government that American intervention in Syria is necessary and would be successful. After five years of brutal, grinding war, this view is understandable. The idea of the United...

  • IISS Voices

    Anastasia Voronkova: One year after the Mali peace agreement, peace is still remote

    12 July 2016.  A year after the Algiers Peace Accord was signed in Mali on 20 June 2015, the peacemaking process continues at a slow pace while prospects of a renewed civil war grow

  • ACD Insight

    One year after the Mali peace agreement, peace is still remote

    12 July 2016.  A year after the Algiers Peace Accord was signed in Mali on 20 June 2015, the peacemaking process continues at a slow pace while prospects of a renewed civil war grow

  • Events

    India’s Policies Towards Pakistan and Afghanistan: Challenges and Opportunities

    08 July 2016. 

    Discussion Meeting
    Rana Banerji, former Special Secretary in the Research and Analysis Wing, India
    Arundel House, London
    Friday 8 July 2016, 12.30–1.30PM BST

  • IISS Voices

    Ben Barry: Britain's Iraq Inquiry - an initial military assessment

    07 July 2016.  The long-awaited results of a seven-year inquiry into the UK's role in the Iraq War of 2003 have finally been published. Here, Ben Barry recalls his own experiences of assessing the British Army's efforts to stabilise the country after the conflict and how he came to similarly uncomfortable conclusions about the UK's failure to achieve its strategic objectives.