• Expert Commentary

    Russia’s use of military force as a foreign policy tool: is there a logic?

    20 October 2016.  Russia has used its military beyond its borders with unprecedented frequency in the period since the invasion of Crimea in February 2014. In this PONARS Policy Memo Samuel Charap explains this behaviour, arguing that we should see Moscow's use of force as one element of a broader coercive bargaining process.

  • Military Balance Blog

    The Kuznetsov questions for NATO

    19 October 2016.  The Russian Navy's sole aircraft carrier, the Admiral Kuznetsov, has been deployed and is thought to be headed to the eastern Mediterranean. Nick Childs argues that despite the carrier's somewhat limited capabilities, NATO has some long-term questions to answer about how to respond to Moscow's willingness to use its maritime assets more assertively.

  • Strategic Comments

    The United States’ Syria quandary

    12 October 2016. 

    Following the collapse of the latest ceasefire, the Obama administration faces increasing pressure from interventionists for more robust military action against the Assad regime. But the United States' military options are problematic. The administration's Syria policy will probably not change substantially before he leaves office in January, though Hillary Clinton – his likely successor – has indicated that she would lean farther forward, in particular by imposing no-fly zones.

  • Military Balance Blog

    French arms exports success – the data behind the numbers

    12 October 2016.  There is no denying that French industry, supported by government, has celebrated genuine successes on the global arms market in recent years. However, as Lucie Béraud-Sudreau argues, the value of actual deliveries, rather than orders, offers a much clearer sense of defence-market trends.

  • Expert Commentary

    New York Times: Don’t Intervene in Syria

    06 October 2016.  The cease-fire in Syria that the United States and Russia tortuously negotiated has, like the one before it, fallen apart. Jonathan Stevenson – Senior Fellow for US Defence and Editor of Strategic Comments at the IISS – and Steven Simon argue that the next step, unsatisfying as it may be, is to try and negotiate a new deal.

  • Politics and Strategy

    Mark Fitzpatrick and Marc Barnett: Putin’s petulance shouldn’t stop US disposal of excess plutonium

    05 October 2016.  Russia’s announcement on 3 October that it was suspending the 2000 agreement with the US to each dispose of 34 tonnes of excess military-use plutonium is an unfortunate departure from what had been the heyday of cooperation between the two superpowers in reducing nuclear dangers. The 68 tonnes of plutonium in question could produce on the order of 17,000 nuclear weapons. Removing it from military arsenals and making it unusable...

  • Strategic Comments

    Cyber conflict and deterrence

    14 September 2016. 

    As with the strategic adaptation to nuclear weapons, effectively developing the policies, doctrines and plans required to stabilise the deterrence of cyber conflict constitutes a long-term challenge. Although major powers have exercised mutual restraint for fear of precipitating uncontrollable consequences, the self-deterrence arising from strategic ambiguity is too uncertain to be sufficient. Deterrence-by-denial mechanisms remain the most promising active measures, and arms control should be pursued.

  • Survival

    Information Warfare and the US Presidential Election

    12 September 2016. 

    If the Russian state was indeed behind the leaking of Democratic National Committee emails, it may have overplayed its hand.

  • Survival

    Dangerous Games

    12 September 2016. 

    How does contemporary Russia view NATO’s public attempts at thinking through scenarios for East–West conflict?

  • IISS Voices

    Jonathan Stevenson: Explaining US policy stasis in Syria

    12 September 2016.  The fragile hope is that the deal tentatively struck last week by John Kerry and Sergey Lavrov for the US and Russia to coordinate counter-jihadist operations and restrain opposition and regime military activity, respectively, will produce a durable ceasefire in Syria and re-energise political talks. As Jonathan Stevenson explains, prospects for success are dubious.

Welcome to the IISS’ new search feature: here you will find content from the Institute on the topic/region selected. Click ‘advanced search options’ to filter by content type, date, related topics and/or experts.

To see your previous purchases and favourites, log-in to My IISS.