In the August–September issue, Daniel Deudney and G. John Ikenberry argue that the Iraq War was the product of foreign-policy realism, not liberalism; Nigel Inkster asks how military cyber power might be measured; Douglas Barrie examines Russia’s deployment of a ground-launched cruise missile in violation of the INF Treaty; Brad Roberts explores approaches to strategic stability under the Obama and Trump administrations; William C. Potter traces the diplomatic route to a nuclear ban treaty; Elizabeth Grimm Arsenault analyses the United States’ dilemma over the treatment of ISIS detainees; Chuck Freilich warns that advocates of Israeli strategic independence from the US...

In the August–September issue, Daniel Deudney and G. John Ikenberry argue that the Iraq War was the product of foreign-policy realism, not liberalism; Nigel Inkster asks how military cyber power might be measured; Douglas Barrie examines Russia’s deployment of a ground-launched cruise missile in violation of the INF Treaty; Brad Roberts explores approaches to strategic stability under the Obama and Trump administrations; William C. Potter traces the diplomatic route to a nuclear ban treaty; Elizabeth Grimm Arsenault analyses the United States’ dilemma over the treatment of ISIS detainees; Chuck Freilich warns that advocates of Israeli strategic independence from the US should be careful what they wish for; Isaac Ben Israel and Deganit Paikowsky describe the logic of Israel’s space programme; Kamil Zwolski examines the radical change in Poland’s foreign policy; Russell Crandall contributes a review essay; Angela Stent, Lanxin Xiang and Gilles Andréani review new books; and Steven Simon argues that Donald Trump’s view on Iran is not just analytically flawed but dangerous.

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  • Realism, Liberalism and the Iraq War

    The 2003 Iraq War was one of the great disasters in the history of American foreign policy. This conclusion is by now, and for good reason, very widely accepted. In the years since the war, however, other, less useful conventional wisdoms have formed. Among these, none is more salient – or more misleading – than the notion that the war was a product of liberalism. This view has been promoted...
  • Measuring Military Cyber Power

    Anyone who has been on a management training course will have been confronted with the proposition that ‘if you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it’. This statement, or some variant thereof, has variously and erroneously been attributed to different management gurus: specifically, W. Edwards Deming, who actually said the exact opposite, namely ‘It is wrong to suppose that if you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it – a...
  • Allegation, Counter-Allegation and the INF Treaty

    Sometime late last year, ground-launched cruise-missile batteries left Russia’s Kapustin Yar test range, possibly on flatbed rail trucks.1 Amongst these, United States officials contend, was a system that drives a coach and horses through the 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty. Washington asserts that the cruise missile deployed at the end of 2016 has a range significantly above the INF Treaty threshold. Russia has so far dismissed the US claims. The...
  • Noteworthy

    In the August–September issue, Daniel Deudney and G. John Ikenberry argue that the Iraq War was the product of foreign-policy realism, not liberalism; Nigel Inkster asks how military cyber power might be measured; Douglas Barrie examines Russia’s deployment of a ground-launched cruise missile in violation of the INF Treaty; Brad Roberts explores approaches to strategic stability under the Obama and Trump administrations; William C. Potter traces the diplomatic route to...
  • Strategic Stability Under Obama and Trump

    As an organising concept, strategic stability played a central role in the strategic policy of the Obama administration, as set out in its policy and posture reviews of 2009 and 2010. The administration used strategic stability as a guide to policy development in a changed security environment, and valued it particularly in advancing cooperation with Russia and China at what seemed a hopeful moment in relations with both countries. Eight...
  • Disarmament Diplomacy and the Nuclear Ban Treaty

    The inclusion of a little-noticed phrase in the final document agreed by a review conference of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) in 2010 can be seen, in retrospect, to have laid the foundation for what, some seven years later, has become a surprisingly successful effort to achieve a legally binding prohibition on nuclear weapons – or, as it is commonly known, a nuclear ban treaty. At the time of writing...
  • US Detention Policy Towards ISIS: Between a Rock and a Hard Place

    The United States’ resort to torture in responding to past terrorist threats raises questions about how the country will deal with captured members of the Islamic State (also known as ISIS or ISIL). As a US-led coalition seeks to retake the ISIS stronghold in northern Iraq – and after that Raqqa, the group’s Syrian headquarters – the United States has opted to delegate responsibility for detainee handling to Iraqi and...
  • Can Israel Survive Without America?

    The importance of the United States to Israel’s national security cannot be overstated. Washington is usually the first, and often the sole, port of call for strategic consultation – almost always the foremost one, and inevitably the primary means of addressing the challenges Israel faces. America is the be-all and end-all of most policy deliberations in Israeli national-security decision-making forums. Some four decades into this ‘special relationship’, the price of...
  • The Iron Wall Logic of Israel’s Space Programme

    Israel’s space programme includes the capability to build, operate and launch satellites into space. In 1988, only seven years after the programme was established, Israel launched its first satellite, Ofeq-1.1 At that time, only seven countries had demonstrated an indigenous capability to develop and launch satellites. Given the high costs and risks involved in undertaking such an ambitious national project, it might appear surprising that a small country like Israel...
  • Poland’s Foreign-Policy Turn

    Following its 2015 parliamentary and presidential elections, Poland has reversed its consistently pro-European foreign policy, marking a radical departure from its post-1989 course. Whether this turn is the result of some well-developed strategy, or merely a natural extension of illiberal domestic reforms introduced by the new government, is irrelevant.1 What matters is the outcome. Poland is no longer an engine of European integration, nor does it seem to value its...
  • The Black Bonaparte

    Toussaint Louverture: A Revolutionary Life Philippe Girard. New York: Basic Books, 2017. $29.99. 352 pp. The revolt of African slaves that erupted in Saint-Domingue in late August 1791 occurred in France’s most lucrative New World colony. Encompassing the western third of Hispaniola Island since 1659 and representing the most ‘profitable stretch of real estate on the planet’ according to historian Edward Baptist, the colony’s sugar, coffee, indigo and cotton served as the...
  • Book Reviews

    Russia and Eurasia Angela Stent A Wary Embrace: What the China–Russia Relationship Means for the World Bobo Lo. Sydney: Lowy Institute for International Policy and Penguin Random House Australia, 2017. AUD9.99. 184 pp. In the aftermath of the 2014 Ukraine crisis, Western attempts to isolate Russia and the imposition of sanctions led to a reinvigorated Russian pivot to China. Both sides played up their enhanced bilateral cooperation; a $400 billion gas deal was signed;...
  • Brief Notices

    Russia and Eurasia Beyond the Euromaidan: Comparative Perspectives on Advancing Reform in Ukraine Henry E. Hale and Robert W. Orttung, eds. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2016. $70.00. 322 pp. In the aftermath of the Euromaidan revolution and Russia’s incursion into Ukraine in 2014, this volume suggests that reforms are needed in Ukraine to address problems such as internal divisions, corruption, the constitution and judiciary, oligarchs and the economy. The authors argue that...
  • Rollback?

    The Trump administration, for all its disarray, has a clear and consistent policy toward the Middle East. In other theatres, administration policy seems to lack organising principles – in Europe, for example, where the United States’ commitment to NATO has been both derided and valourised, and in Asia, where China is a threat one minute and an ally the next. Washington’s approach to the Middle East, by contrast, is distinguished...
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Survival: Global Politics and Strategy

August–September 2017

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