In the June–July 2016 issue of Survival, Lawrence Freedman, François Heisbourg, Nigel Inkster, Matthew Harries and Erik Jones debate Brexit; Lanxin Xiang and Christian Dargnat analyse Xi Jinping’s dreams of China’s future; Aaron Arnold warns of the costs of financial sanctions; Andrea Berger and Denny Roy address the problem of North Korea; Sarah Percy and Ryan D. Martinson discuss crime and provocation at sea; Brian G. Carlson assesses the prospects for a China–Russia alliance; Pierre Hassner, Russell Crandall and Erik Jones contribute book reviews; and Faisal Hamid explores Bangladesh’s social strife.

In the June–July 2016 issue of Survival, Lawrence Freedman, François Heisbourg, Nigel Inkster, Matthew Harries and Erik Jones debate Brexit; Lanxin Xiang and Christian Dargnat analyse Xi Jinping’s dreams of China’s future; Aaron Arnold warns of the costs of financial sanctions; Andrea Berger and Denny Roy address the problem of North Korea; Sarah Percy and Ryan D. Martinson discuss crime and provocation at sea; Brian G. Carlson assesses the prospects for a China–Russia alliance; Pierre Hassner, Russell Crandall and Erik Jones contribute book reviews; and Faisal Hamid explores Bangladesh’s social strife.

From £10.00
Product variations
Online Access, Digital Download & Print £30.00 + shipping (Inc VAT if applicable)
Online Access & Digital Download £20.00 (Inc VAT if applicable)
Print edition £10.00 + shipping (Inc VAT if applicable)
  • Brexit and the Law of Unintended Consequences

    There is no clear prospectus for a United Kingdom outside the European Union, or for an EU without the UK. ‘Brexit’ is presented as a great escape from a remote bureaucracy impervious to democratic accountability. Once liberated from Brussels, according to the Leave campaign, the nation will be able to achieve, through its energy and resourcefulness, great things that are currently beyond its grasp. What those great things might be...
  • Brexit and European Security

    In the narrowest of terms, European security and defence are areas in which a British exit from the European Union would have comparatively little effect. Despite the launching in 1998 by France and the United Kingdom of what soon became a European Security and Defence Policy (ESDP, subsequently the Common Security and Defence Policy or CSDP), Britain ceased to invest politically or military in the ESDP in any substantial manner...
  • Brexit, Intelligence and Terrorism

    The debate about whether the United Kingdom will be better off in or out of the European Union is driven more by emotion than by rational analysis. To the extent that rationality has played a role, it has applied to the question of which option will leave the British people economically more prosperous. But claims have also been made, by exponents of both camps, that the UK will be more...
  • Brexit and Political Malpractice

    David Cameron is a weak prime minister leading a divided government. The peculiar thing about this assertion is that it is probably more valid now than it was when Cameron was in charge of a two-party coalition, an extreme rarity in British politics. In May 2015 Cameron won an extraordinary general-election victory, becoming the first full-term incumbent prime minister since 1832 to increase his party’s share of the vote and...
  • Brexit’s Lessons for Democracy

    Regardless of the result, the British referendum on European Union membership is a watershed moment. The campaign has already taught us important lessons about direct democracy, European integration and political communication. ‘Europe’ has changed as a consequence. The referendum may turn out to be a salutary experience; it may also set a destabilising precedent. We may nevertheless be wiser coming out of the process – at least in certain respects...
  • Noteworthy

    In the June–July 2016 issue of Survival, Lawrence Freedman, François Heisbourg, Nigel Inkster, Matthew Harries and Erik Jones debate Brexit; Lanxin Xiang and Christian Dargnat analyse Xi Jinping’s dreams of China’s future; Aaron Arnold warns of the costs of financial sanctions; Andrea Berger and Denny Roy address the problem of North Korea; Sarah Percy and Ryan D. Martinson discuss crime and provocation at sea; Brian G. Carlson assesses the prospects...
  • Xi’s Dream and China’s Future

    Xi Jinping has never liked the popular Western phrase, ‘the rise of China’. He prefers China’s ‘restoration’ (fuxing) – describing an arc of recovery after the century-long free fall following the Opium Wars. Despite Xi’s ambitious project of cultural restoration, however, the People’s Republic of China is facing its most serious legitimacy crisis since its founding in 1949. At first glance this seems counter-intuitive, given that the Chinese Communist Party...
  • China’s Shifting Geo-economic Strategy

    Against an international backdrop of slowing global trade and the rise of the service industry over manufacturing, the Chinese economic model is approaching exhaustion. China is struggling to confront over-indebtedness, excess production capacity, declining competitiveness, unfavourable demographics and the flight of capital. In response, the Chinese government is adopting a change in geo-economic strategy, based on two major initiatives: a transformation of its domestic financial system, and the ‘One Belt...
  • The True Costs of Financial Sanctions

    In summer 2015, the United States, United Kingdom, France, Russia, China and Germany – collectively known as the P5+1 – inked a historic agreement with Iran, which obstructed Iran’s pathways to a nuclear weapon in exchange for sanctions relief. To be sure, the sanctions had taken a toll on Iran’s economy. From 2012 to 2014, macroeconomic indicators suggested Iran was in serious trouble. It would be easy to infer that...
  • Disrupting North Korea’s Military Markets

    Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni eagerly observed the April 2014 graduation ceremony of 692 newly trained recruits at the Kabalye Police Training School in Masindi. Commenting upon the occasion for journalists present, Museveni thanked the country that had so reliably provided the training assistance for the course: not the United States, Germany or Rwanda, which have all assisted the Ugandan police and defence forces in past years, but rather ‘the government...
  • Preparing for a North Korean Nuclear Missile

    The crisis over North Korea’s nuclear-weapons programme, now stretching into a third decade, is worsening. There seems little chance that North Korea will give up its arsenal absent a drastic change in circumstances. Pyongyang has repeatedly said its status as a nuclear-weapons state is permanent, even writing this into its constitution in 2012. In the minds of the North Korean people, elevating the country into the nuclear-weapons club is perhaps...
  • Maritime Crime and Naval Response

    There is no disputing the importance of the world’s oceans for global trade, 90% of which relies on maritime routes. However, while maritime trading routes are sources of prosperity and wealth, they are also characterised by high levels of criminal activity. Trafficking in all types of goods, from drugs to weapons to people, relies on maritime transport. Illegal, unauthorised and under-reported (IUU) fishing, or the theft of fishing stocks, poses...
  • Shepherds of the South Seas

    On 21 July 2014, a Chinese law-enforcement ship, YZ 32501, arrived at its home port in Nantong, Jiangsu. As its crew disembarked, they were received by a senior officer from the China Coast Guard, who had travelled from Shanghai for the event. He thanked them for their 80 days of ‘continuous combat’ in the South China Sea. Eighty days was a long deployment for a ship of this size (just 500...
  • China–Russia Relations and the Inertia of History

    US relations with both China and Russia have become increasingly fraught. The broad outlines of a potential great-power clash between the United States and a rising China are growing more apparent each year. Against this backdrop, a series of maritime disputes between China and its neighbours, including US allies, threaten regional stability in Asia. US–Russian relations, meanwhile, have suffered greatly from the Ukraine crisis, plunging to their lowest level since...
  • Book Reviews

    Politics and International Relations Pierre Hassner Is the West in Decline? Historical, Military, and Economic Perspectives Benjamin M. Rowland, ed. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2015. $90.00. 214 pp. The consistently interesting contributions to this volume were written mainly by friends and former students of Professor David Calleo of the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies in Washington DC. Yet its chapters are notably diverse both in their approach and in their level...
  • Brief Notices

    Politics and International Relations Deep Cosmopolis: Rethinking World Politics and Globalization Adam K. Webb. Abingdon: Routledge, 2015. £90.00. 239 pp. Webb seeks to counter what he sees as prevailing notions of cosmopolitanism, which hold that global citizenship is incompatible with traditional practices. According to him, history reveals an alternative model of cosmopolitanism which seeks ‘deep ethical parallels’ among diverse traditions, and which offers lessons for a world grappling with the rise of non-Western...
  • Fear and Loathing in Dhaka

    Before 15 February 2013, you might have had little cause to worry about Faisal bin Nayem or Rezwanul Azad Rana, both pious students at a prestigious university in Dhaka. But of Ahmed Rajib Haider, the man they killed that day, it is said that his face ‘was so lacerated that a relative who found the body wasn’t sure it was him until he called Haider’s cell phone and heard it...
Back to content list

Survival: Global Politics and Strategy

June-July 2016

Also available in Kindle and iPad format:

Kindle UK > 

Kindle US >

iPad >

iBookstore UK >

iBookstore US >


Table of Contents

Available to download as a PDF >