In the October–November issue of Survival, Nigel Inkster analyses Sino-American competition in space and cyberspace, David P. Calleo argues for a new narrative in transatlantic relations and Steven Simon discusses America’s limited power in Egypt. Also in the issue: Shashank Joshi and Aaron Stein on emerging drone nations; Nick Bisley and Andrew Phillips on US strategic geography in Asia; and Brendan Taylor on China’s relations with North Korea.

In the October–November issue of Survival, Nigel Inkster analyses Sino-American competition in space and cyberspace, David P. Calleo argues for a new narrative in transatlantic relations and Steven Simon discusses America’s limited power in Egypt. Also in the issue: Shashank Joshi and Aaron Stein on emerging drone nations; Nick Bisley and Andrew Phillips on US strategic geography in Asia; and Brendan Taylor on China’s relations with North Korea.

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  • Conflict Foretold: America and China

    In his novella Chronicle of a Death Foretold, Gabriel García Márquez tells the story of two brothers who are driven to murder the man who they believe has deflowered their sister. Everyone in the small town where the action takes place believes that the intended victim will be murdered. But for a variety of reasons, mostly mundane, nobody warns him or tries to prevent the murder from taking place. It...
  • China’s Anxiety About US Missile Defence: A Solution

    On 26 March 2012, the United States announced its ballistic-missile-defence (BMD) plan in the Asia-Pacific and the Middle East. The following August, it was reported that Washington was planning to deploy two forward-based X-band (FBX) radars in southern Japan and Southeast Asia (perhaps the Philippines) to supplement the one already positioned in Aomori Prefecture in northern Japan. During his visit to Japan in September 2012, then US Secretary of Defense...
  • Emerging Drone Nations

    Just weeks after Nazi Germany began to use the V-1 missile to attack the United Kingdom in 1944, the United States began work on a pilotless bomber to attack targets deep inside German-held territory. The programme was beset with problems, and converted B-17 and B-24 bombers were only able to fly 13 unsuccessful test missions. Nevertheless, the emergence of long-range missile technology, as well as these early tests in pilotless...
  • Egypt’s Sorrow and America’s Limits

    In 2003 Mohammed Hafez, who now teaches at the Naval Postgraduate School in the United States, published a book called Why Muslims Rebel. Acknowledging his debt, at least for the title, to Ted Gurr’s 1970 classic, Why Men Rebel, Hafez aimed to apply social-movement theory to the Muslim world. His purpose, in effect, was to normalise such movements, especially as they had emerged in the Middle East and North Africa...
  • Does China Still Back North Korea?

    China’s relationship with North Korea has long been likened to the closeness between lips and teeth. Since the 1960s, North Korea has been China’s most important ally. But relations between Beijing and Pyongyang seem to be souring. China supported new sanctions imposed against North Korea in January and March 2013 following the latter’s latest ballistic-missile and nuclear tests. According to South Korean officials, Beijing has instructed local governments to implement...
  • Noteworthy

    Chemical reactions ‘Make no mistake – this has implications beyond chemical warfare. If we won’t enforce accountability in the face of this heinous act, what does it say about our resolve to stand up to others who flout fundamental international rules? To governments who would choose to build nuclear arms? To terrorists who would spread biological weapons? To armies who carry out genocide? . . . members of Congress of both...
  • A Rebalance To Where?: US Strategic Geography in Asia

    In late 2011 and early 2012, the Obama administration rolled out its most significant strategic policy decision: the ‘rebalancing’ of its foreign- and defence-policy priorities towards Asia. The administration took the view that American policy had become unbalanced by its heavy commitments in Iraq and Afghanistan, and that it needed to recalibrate its approach to better reflect the long-term character of America’s interests and the seismic geopolitical changes occurring in...
  • US Strategy in a Post-Western World

    It received precious little attention. But the World Bank report earlier this year indicating that, for the first time, trade between developing countries – ‘South–South trade’ in the parlance – has surpassed their trade with Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) nations is a milestone in the transformation of the global system. Developing nations now account for roughly one-third of world trade. This is a telling sign of the...
  • Turkey’s New Kurdish Opening

    At the end of December 2012, the government of Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan agreed to begin exploratory discussions with Abdullah Ocalan, the imprisoned head of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK), aimed at ending the group’s insurgency, which has cost some 40,000 lives. The talks have resulted in some promising initial steps. On 8 May, the first contingents of PKK forces began withdrawing from Turkey, with further withdrawals expected...
  • Does Morality Matter in Security Policy?: An Exchange

    Editor’s Note  In this exchange, Jack Spence comments on David Fisher’s essay on morality which appeared in the June–July 2013 issue of Survival. Fisher’s response follows. A Reply to David Fisher Jack Spence David Fisher’s analysis of the role of morality in foreign policy is timely and closely argued. The topic is a perennial concern. It exercises the minds of both politicians and academics, increasingly so in a world plagued with man-made disasters that...
  • Stanley McChrystal, Special Forces and the Wars of 9/11

    My Share of the Task: A Memoir Stanley McChrystal. London: Portfolio Penguin, 2013. £19.99/$29.95. 452 pp. Elite forces raised for especially difficult missions are as old as armies themselves. The British in the Second World War created an eclectic menagerie of units to operate behind enemy lines, including army and marine commandos (the model for the US Army Rangers); the Long Range Desert Group for ground reconnaissance; and the Special Air Service...
  • Political Cartoons: A Dying Art?

    The Art of Controversy: Political Cartoons and Their Enduring Power Victor S. Navasky. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2013. $27.95. 232 pp. In July 2013, the Syrian Electronic Army – a group of pro-regime cyber-warriors – hacked into the Thomson Reuters Twitter account and used it to spread cartoons that criticised the United States, Israel and the Syrian rebels. In one of the more subtle renderings, Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan gives...
  • Book Reviews

    Economy Ian Bremmer Breakout Nations: In Pursuit of the Next Economic Miracles Ruchir Sharma. London: Allen Lane, 2012. £25.00/$26.95. 292 pp. ‘In a world reshaped by slower global growth, we need to start looking at the emerging markets as individual cases.’ Amen. Ruchir Sharma’s Breakout Nations is this decade’s response to Jim O’Neill coining the term ‘BRICs’ – an acronym for the rising global economic power of Brazil, Russia, India and China – back...
  • Brief Notices

    Economy Affluence and Influence: Economic Inequality and Political Power in America Martin Gilens. New York and Princeton, NJ: Russell Sage Foundations and Princeton University Press, 2012. £24.95/$35.00. 329 pp. Gilens argues that America’s policymakers respond almost exclusively to the needs and preferences of the rich. With extensive data, he examines thousands of proposed policy changes and the degree of support among different income groups – showing that representational inequality is spread across policy...
  • Europe and America in a New Century

    I For most of modern history, Europe has been America’s Significant Other. For the past half century in particular, an alliance between the two has dominated world politics. But how long can this alliance be expected to last, and in what form? How well does it fit the world likely to evolve in the twenty-first century? The present close relationship was not inevitable, as a study of its history indicates. Throughout the...
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Survival: Global Politics and Strategy

October–November 2013

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