In the June–July issue of Survival, Mark Fitzpatrick and David C. Gompert discuss regime change in North Korea; Massimo Franco explores how Francis I’s appointment will affect the Catholic Church; and Vanda Felbab-Brown examines the influence of crime on military conflicts. Also in the issue: David Fisher on morality in security policy, Erik Jones on preserving the euro and Antônio Sampaio on South America after the death of Hugo Chávez.

In the June–July issue of Survival, Mark Fitzpatrick and David C. Gompert discuss regime change in North Korea; Massimo Franco explores how Francis I’s appointment will affect the Catholic Church; and Vanda Felbab-Brown examines the influence of crime on military conflicts. Also in the issue: David Fisher on morality in security policy, Erik Jones on preserving the euro and Antônio Sampaio on South America after the death of Hugo Chávez.

From £10.00
Product variations
Online Access, Digital Download & Print £80.00 + shipping
Online Access & Digital Download £70.00
Print edition £10.00 + shipping
  • North Korea: Is Regime Change the Answer?

    Regime change is not an immediate answer to the current challenges posed by the Democratic People’s Republic of North Korea (DPRK). But North Korea’s bellicose actions and statements since late 2012 reinforce the conclusion that, in the long run, there is only one happy ending to this long-running tragedy: unification of the Korean Peninsula as a democratic, free-enterprise-based republic that would be free of nuclear weapons. As a policy tool...
  • North Korea: Preparing for the End

    Even if the immediate Korean crisis eases, the underlying problem of a crippled but dangerous North Korean state will remain. The state, as we know it, may not survive for long. Yet, given its paranoia, the Kim regime can be expected to strike at its enemies if and as it faces oblivion. On top of a possible human apocalypse in the North, the stakes for the United States include the...
  • Japan’s New Politics

    In December 2012, Japan’s Liberal Democratic Party, led by Shinzo Abe, achieved a landslide election victory. After three years of rule by the Democratic Party of Japan, Abe, who first served as prime minister between September 2006 and September 2007, regained power by capitalising on growing nationalism and a heightened sense of national-security threats among Japanese voters. Abe’s revisionist views about Japan’s history and global role are well known. During his...
  • The Taiwan Strait: Still Dangerous

    In recent years tensions across the Taiwan Strait have been overshadowed by fear of war on the Korean Peninsula. Commentators have even suggested that Taiwan’s strategic relations with China have improved to the point of opening avenues for a peaceful settlement and US disengagement. This would remove a potential trigger for US–China military confrontation and could greatly improve the relationship between these two major powers. But this view is overly...
  • South America After Chávez

    From fists in the air to military salutes, there was plenty of revolutionary posturing from left-wing leaders – and even Hollywood actor Sean Penn – at the 8 March 2013 funeral of Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez. While many of the 32 heads of state in attendance came from Latin American countries that receive cheap oil from Venezuela, others, such as Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko, saw...
  • The First Global Pope

    Jorge Maria Bergoglio – Pope Francis I – is the first truly global pontiff. It is not just that the Argentinian was picked up ‘almost at the ends of the world’, as he put it in his first public appearance as pope. The dynamics of the conclave on 12–13 March 2013 showed that, for the Vatican, it was the end of an era. The Americas have moved from the periphery...
  • Noteworthy

    Common ground ‘It is not fair that a Palestinian child cannot grow up in a state of her own, and lives with the presence of a foreign army that controls the movements of her parents every single day. It is not just when settler violence against Palestinians goes unpunished. It is not right to prevent Palestinians from farming their lands; to restrict a student’s ability to move around the West...
  • The Euro Crisis: No Plan B

    Within our mandate, the ECB is ready to do whatever it takes to safeguard the euro. And believe me, it will be enough. Mario Draghi, 26 July 2012 European bond markets have moved into a period of relative calm. The spread between long-term Italian and German government interest rates is back down to levels last seen when Silvio Berlusconi was Italian prime minister. The spread between Spanish and German debt is higher...
  • The Pentagon and the Pivot

    Chinese officials and analysts regard the US pivot towards the Asia-Pacific as a strategy to contain China, despite Washington’s claim that it does not focus on a particular country. Instead of accepting either Chinese scepticism or US official statements at face value, this article attempts to trace the origins and examine the evolution of the pivot through the lens of the Pentagon’s internal think tank, the Office of Net Assessment...
  • After Fukushima: China’s Nuclear Safety

    In the aftermath of the nuclear accident at Fukushima, Japan in 2011, several governments, notably those of Japan, Germany, Switzerland and Italy, abandoned plans to extend or increase their nuclear capacity. Globally, however, the impact on nuclear-energy expansion may be rather modest. China is among the countries that will continue to build nuclear power plants, and it should be a leader in finding ways to build and operate them safely. ...
  • Does Morality Matter in Security Policy?

    Politicians like to talk about morality, but the complaint of the realist is that such talk is just moonshine. John Mearsheimer famously remarked that ‘the pronouncements of the policy elites are heavily flavoured with optimism and moralism. Behind closed doors, however, the elites who make national policy speak mostly the language of power.’ So is it moonshine, or do moral considerations at least sometimes shape security policy? Some light...
  • Crime–War Battlefields

    Military conflicts around the world increasingly conjoin political violence, organised crime and illicit economies. In many regions, domestic law-enforcement responses to organised crime resemble warfare. Government suppression of urban crime and rural instability in Latin America and South Asia, for example, progressively merges police and military operations. In Mexico, Brazil and Central America, clashes between criminals and the authorities often have the intensity of intra-state urban conflict. Modern militaries were not...
  • ‘Green on Blue’: Insider Attacks in Afghanistan

    From January 2011 to December 2012 there were more than 60 attacks by members of Afghan National Security Forces on members of the US and coalition forces, with more taking place in the last six months of 2012 than in the entire previous year. This violence, which appears to be increasing, has generated a new term, ‘green on blue’, from the canonical US military colour designation for friendly and US...
  • The Problem with Premature Appeasement

    The China Choice: Why America Should Share Power Hugh White. Collingwood: Black Inc, 2012. AU$29.99. 208 pp. For the Asia-Pacific region, perhaps the greatest strategic problem of the next two decades is maintaining peace and prosperity while a second great power emerges to rival the United States. Policymakers attempting to manage this issue will need the best advice available from experienced and thoughtful analysts of Asian history, politics and international relations. ...
  • Book Reviews

    Europe Erik Jones Reforming the European Union: Realizing the Impossible Daniel Finke, Thomas König, Sven-Oliver Proksch and George Tsebelis. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2012. £55.00/$80.00. 248 pp. European leaders ‘shared the belief that a reform of the existing institutions was necessary’ and so they pushed through substantive changes, despite opposition (p. 188). This can be demonstrated through the measurement of national positions about both the institutions and the policies of...
  • Brief Notices

    Europe Islam’s Marriage with Neoliberalism: State Transformation in Turkey Yildiz Atasoy. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. £60.00/$85.00. 288 pp. Atasoy traces the influence of secularism and Islam on Turkish state formation from Ottoman times to the present, exploring in particular how neoliberal capitalist ideas are interacting with modern Islamic thinking in the context of Turkey’s EU membership bid. The Greek-Turkish Conflict in the Aegean: Imagined Enemies Alexis Heraclides. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan...
  • Thatcher, Still Personal

    I The death of Margaret Thatcher prompted an effusion of words – some hagiographic, some grudgingly appreciative and some still full of hate. Whether positive or negative, what was striking was how personal were the views expressed. What she did and said touched nerves and affected lives all over the United Kingdom, and even 23 years after she left office, it was hard for Britons to achieve any kind of studied...
Back to content list

How to access Survival: Global Politics and Strategy

The bi-monthly journal of international and strategic affairs.

Survival: Global Politics and Strategy

June–July 2013

Also available in Kindle and iPad format:

Kindle UK > 

Kindle US >

iPad >

Table of Contents

Available to download as a PDF >