In the February–March issue of Survival, James Dobbins discusses the need for progress towards nuclear disarmament; Kyle Johnson and Michael Jonsson analyse Colombia’s peace negotiations with the FARC; and Nigel Inkster examines China’s cyber capabilities. Also in the issue: Giorgio La Malfa on the eurozone crisis, Paul D. Miller on transition in Afghanistan and David P. Calleo on capitalism’s destructive side.

From £10.00
Product variations
Online Access, Digital Download & Print £30.00 + shipping (Inc VAT if applicable)
Online Access & Digital Download £20.00 (Inc VAT if applicable)
Print edition £10.00 + shipping (Inc VAT if applicable)
  • Why Eliminate Nuclear Weapons?

    On 5 April 2009 in Prague, US President Barack Obama asserted the United States’ commitment to ‘seek the peace and security of a world without nuclear weapons’. He was adding his voice and the efforts of his administration to the growing number of world leaders, citizens and civil-society organisations seeking the elimination of such weapons. Banning the bomb has been a passionate and often popular crusade since its creation and...
  • Russia, Syria and the Doctrine of Intervention

    Since the beginning of the Syrian crisis, there have been intermittent hopes that Moscow might play a constructive diplomatic role in resolving it. But the focus on Russia has been deeply misleading. Russia, for reasons that have little to do with Syria itself, was never going to be part of the solution to the crisis – at least on terms that the West and the Syrian opposition could accept. Further...
  • Noteworthy

    Birth of a nation? ‘The General Assembly is called upon today to issue a birth certificate of the reality of the state of Palestine’ Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas at the UN General Assembly ‘The world watched a defamatory and venomous speech that was full of mendacious propaganda against the Israel Defense Forces and the citizens of Israel … Someone who wants peace does not talk in such a manner.’ Prime Minister...
  • Chinese Intelligence in the Cyber Age

    In comparison with other major powers, relatively little has been written about the modern capabilities of the Chinese intelligence agencies. The public consciousness of Western audiences is certainly not infused with dramatic episodes equivalent to the United Kingdom’s code-breaking successes against Nazi Germany during the Second World War, or the spy/counter-spy narrative which characterised the Cold War. Within China itself, there is such a narrative, but it is situated squarely...
  • Colombia: Ending the Forever War?

    Is the world’s longest active civil war finally coming to an end? In November 2012 the Colombian government and the left-wing guerrilla group Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia (FARC) began full-fledged peace negotiations in Havana, Cuba. But the mood in Bogotá is ambivalent, with a yearning for peace tempered by a deep-seated distrust of FARC and its negotiating tactics. Developments over the past decade have brought Colombia to a point where...
  • The US and Afghanistan After 2014

    The United States is not scheduled to withdraw from Afghanistan in 2014. President Barack Obama made clear in his May 2012 speech in Kabul that the United States would continue to train Afghan security forces and undertake counter-terrorism operations, which are likely to require thousands of US troops to operate in the country for years to come. The year 2014 is a date for transition, not withdrawal, and the international...
  • Overcoming Obstacles to Peace

    Societies emerging from conflict face many obstacles to achieving enduring peace, economic development and political reform. These include sectarian divides, historical animosities, poverty, weak institutions and malign neighbours. Some analysts have found these local factors so various as to argue that there can be no generic approaches to post-conflict stabilisation and reconstruction (known more colloquially as nation-building). Others have argued that these obstacles are so daunting as to make the...
  • Pakistan’s Populist Foreign Policy

    If US policymakers did not fully understand before 2011 how important the so-called ‘Arab street’ is in the politics of the Middle East and North Africa, they surely do by now. Whether this principle extends to other parts of the Muslim world is not yet clear, but in Pakistan, one of America’s most important Muslim-majority allies, the effect of public opinion on the country’s politics, including its foreign policy, may...
  • The Limping Euro

    The Maastricht Treaty of 1992 launched European Monetary Union, outlining a three-phase process towards the euro. The first two stages were preparatory and focused on the new system’s organisational aspects, with special reference to the workings of the European Central Bank and economic and financial convergence among candidate members. Convergence, based on the so-called Maastricht criteria, would decide which countries were to be allowed to take part in the third...
  • The Tyranny of Want

    How Much is Enough? The Love of Money and the Case for a Good Life Robert Skidelsky and Edward Skidelsky. London: Allen Lane, 2012. £20. 256pp. In economics, as in politics, bad times often inspire good books. Capitalism’s distress in the interwar years aroused the creative powers of a brilliant galaxy of economists pushed by troubled times into examining the historical and philosophical foundations of their discipline. Any list would include not...
  • The Myths of October

    The Cuban Missile Crisis in American Memory: Myths Versus Reality Sheldon M. Stern. Palo Alto, CA: Stanford University Press, 2012. $75.00/£67.50. 208 pp. The Years of Lyndon Johnson, Volume Four: The Passage of Power Robert A. Caro. New York: Albert Knopf, 2012. $35.00/£35.00. 714 pp. The Armageddon Letters: Kennedy, Khrushchev, Castro in the Cuban Missile Crisis James Blight and Janet Lang. New York: Rowman & Littlefield, 2012. $39.95/£24.95. 320 pp. Just over 50 years ago...
  • Book Reviews

    Arms, Arms Control and Technology Bruno Tertrais Worm: The First Digital World War Mark Bowden. New York: Grove Press, 2012. $15.00. 291 pp. Mark Bowden, a journalist well-known for two forays in geostrategic matters (Black Hawk Down and Guests of the Ayatollahs), has now chosen to tell the story of the fight against one the biggest threats to the security of the Internet ever discovered, the Conficker virus. The ‘worm’, which appeared in 2008, targeted...
  • Brief Notices

    Arms, Arms Control and Technology The Doomsday Machine: The High Price of Nuclear Energy, the World’s Most Dangerous Fuel Martin Cohen and Andrew McKillop. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012. £16.99/$27.00. 242 pp. The authors challenge the view that nuclear power is cheaper, cleaner and safer than other forms of energy, contending that politicians often cooperate with industry to conceal the high costs of nuclear development, including government subsidies and public-funded emergency-response systems, environmental degradation...
  • Letter from Italy

    In Messina, Sicily, a fat old man is addressing an excited crowd. He screams and sweats. He is wearing a checkered shirt and blue jeans. His greyish curls bounce while he jumps about the stage. He starts telling his audience how he swam across the Strait of Messina, the strip of sea between the southern tip of Calabria and the eastern tip of Sicily, and how the water smelled like...
Back to content list

Survival: Global Politics and Strategy

February-March 2013

Also available in Kindle and iPad format:

Kindle UK > 

Kindle US >

iPad >

Table of Contents

Available to download as a PDF >