When the American military presence in Iraq ended in December 2011, Washington and Baghdad claimed that Iraq was a stable, sustainable democracy. However, this appears questionable as Nuri al-Maliki, prime minister since 2006, has continued his quest to dominate the state and to use its power to break opposition to his rule,  leaving the country vulnerable to heightened sectarian tension and a new civil war.

When the American military presence in Iraq ended in December 2011, Washington and Baghdad claimed that Iraq was a stable, sustainable democracy. However, this appears questionable as Nuri al-Maliki, prime minister since 2006, has continued his quest to dominate the state and to use its power to break opposition to his rule. His systematic exclusion of key politicians from power underlines the failure of the 2010 elections to deliver representative government, and leaves the country vulnerable to heightened sectarian tension and a new civil war.

Online Access & Digital Download £5.00
Product variations
Online Access & Digital Download £5.00
Back to content list

Social divisions and rising terrorist violence in Turkey

In the past 18 months, Turkey has not appreciably reduced Kurdish militant groups' terrorist capabilities or addressed their grievances. Accordingly, terrorist violence in the country is set to rise in the near future.

Africa and the International Criminal Court

The decision by three African states to begin withdrawing from the ICC has raised fears of a mass exodus. Can it remain a viable institution on the continent?