When the American military presence in Iraq ended in December 2011, Washington and Baghdad claimed that Iraq was a stable, sustainable democracy. However, this appears questionable as Nuri al-Maliki, prime minister since 2006, has continued his quest to dominate the state and to use its power to break opposition to his rule,  leaving the country vulnerable to heightened sectarian tension and a new civil war.

When the American military presence in Iraq ended in December 2011, Washington and Baghdad claimed that Iraq was a stable, sustainable democracy. However, this appears questionable as Nuri al-Maliki, prime minister since 2006, has continued his quest to dominate the state and to use its power to break opposition to his rule. His systematic exclusion of key politicians from power underlines the failure of the 2010 elections to deliver representative government, and leaves the country vulnerable to heightened sectarian tension and a new civil war.

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ISIS gains ground in sub-Saharan Africa

ISIS has had a varying degree of success in making inroads among sub-Saharan African jihadist groups linked to al-Qaeda. The latter still exerts strong influence, especially in the Sahel and the Horn of Africa.

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US election: Clinton versus whom?

With such a crowded field, predicting the future of the Republican contest is more difficult than usual.