A new row over the South China Sea has erupted following Beijing's issue of biometric passports containing a map showing the so-called 'nine-dashed line' that China has used to assert its sovereignty over disputed islands. By printing the passports, and inviting other states to stamp their visas in them, Beijing is attempting to gain recognition for its claims to sovereignty.

A new row over the South China Sea has erupted following Beijing's issue of biometric passports containing a map showing the so-called 'nine-dashed line' that China has used to assert its sovereignty over disputed islands. By printing the passports, and inviting other states to stamp their visas in them, Beijing is attempting to gain recognition for its claims to sovereignty.

States in contention with China over territory have not responded kindly. Vietnam and the Philippines have issued separate visa forms rather than stamping the Chinese passports. Since the map also shows Chinese dominion over territories disputed with India, the Indian government has issued visas to Chinese citizens with its own map of the Sino-Indian border embossed on them. Taiwan has also objected to the new passports, which depict it as part of the People's Republic and feature images of Taiwanese scenic spots.

The spat has highlighted China's recent bolstering of its tactic of 'administrative diplomacy' in the complex South China Sea disputes, as it seeks to exert de facto sovereignty. However, recent events have also underlined the continued intransigence of all parties to the dispute, even while work is under way to establish a code of conduct intended to bind them to resolve the dispute peacefully.

Online Access & Digital Download £10.00
Product variations
Online Access & Digital Download £10.00
Back to content list

Ukraine's election: springboard for change?

Ukraine's new parliament will need to implement long-overdue institutional reforms if it is to avoid another political crisis in the next few years.

Libya's civil war no closer to resolution

Libya Dawn’s gambit of breaking with parliament and seizing Tripoli has yet to deliver a solid return. If no compromise with parliament can be agreed, war is likely to continue.