Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh used his recent visit to Kabul to send the message that, unlike the West, New Delhi has no 'exit strategy' from Afghanistan. India and Pakistan have long competed for influence over their regional neighbour, and Singh's first trip to the country in six years came at a crucial time.

Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh used his recent visit to Kabul to send the message that, unlike the West, New Delhi has no 'exit strategy' from Afghanistan. India and Pakistan have long competed for influence over their regional neighbour, and Singh's first trip to the country in six years came at a crucial time – with the US preparing for a troop drawdown and US–Pakistan relations strained by the discovery and killing of Osama bin Laden in Abbottabad. By supporting Afghan President Hamid Karzai’s peace efforts with Taliban insurgents, committing an extra $500 million in aid and announcing a 'strategic partnership', Singh was making clear India's long-term interest in Afghanistan.

Online Access & Digital Download £5.00
Product variations
Online Access & Digital Download £5.00 (Inc VAT if applicable)
Back to content list

The wider implications of Zapad 2017

Russia's Zapad 2017 exercise conveyed Moscow's determination to re-establish its sphere of influence in the face of NATO’s perceived expansionism.

Security implications of NAFTA’s disruption

US President Donald Trump's ongoing threats to overhaul or repudiate NAFTA have increased tensions with Mexico and engendered defence cooperations.