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The 16th Asia Security Summit, Singapore, 2–4 June 2017.

  • The IISS Shangri-La Dialogue 2017

    Read The IISS Shangri-La Dialogue 2017 book online or download to your tablet or mobile.
  • Foreword

    The International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) organised its 16th annual Shangri-La Dialogue in Singapore on 2–4 June 2017. We are delighted to present this report, which summarises the Dialogue’s open proceedings, including all plenary and special sessions. The full transcripts of these sessions are available on the IISS website. For the first time, the report also includes a section on the Southeast Asian Young Leaders’ Programme (SEAYLP). The 2017 Shangri-La...
  • Introduction

    The first Shangri-La Dialogue was convened by the IISS in 2002 in response to the evident need for a forum where the principals of the region’s national defence establishments – together with their counterparts from the United States and other Western countries with important security interests in the Asia-Pacific – could engage in dialogue aimed at building mutual confidence and fostering practical cooperation. Since then it has become, as Australian...
  • Chapter One: Keynote address and opening dinner

    In his introductory remarks before the keynote address from Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull at the 16th IISS Shangri-La Dialogue’s opening dinner, IISS Director-General and Chief Executive Dr John Chipman noted that Australia shared with other regional states the characteristic of ‘having its most significant economic relationship with China and its most important strategic relationship with the US’, and had an ‘unavoidable, long-term interest in Asian security’. Australia, he said...
  • Chapter Two: The United States and Asia-Pacific security

    United States (US) Secretary of Defense James Mattis opened the first full day of the 2017 Shangri-La Dialogue with words of reassurance. In the face of openly expressed doubts regarding the Trump administration’s reliability as an ally and partner, Mattis insisted that the US was ‘enduring’ in its ‘commitment to the security and prosperity of the region’. Like Malcolm Turnbull, who had delivered the previous evening’s keynote address, he argued...
  • Chapter Three: Upholding the rules-based regional order

    Tomomi Inada, Japan’s minister of defence, opened the second plenary session, noting that the rules-based order had delivered a safe, stable, and inclusive world. She said it was ‘unwise and counterproductive’ for countries which, in economic terms, had benefited most from this system to undermine it. Rules had to adapt in order to remain relevant, the minister argued, but this had to be done in an orderly manner and without...
  • Chapter Four: New challenges for crisis management in the Asia-Pacific

    Malaysian defence minister Dato’ Seri Hishammuddin Tun Hussein provided the first of three different perspectives on crisis management in the Asia-Pacific. Hishammuddin warned that the region is faced with a range of fires, small and big, that regional powers will have to scramble to put out. He suggested that the region is in a paradoxical position: at relative peace, but with underlying tensions and actions by non-state actors that threaten...
  • Chapter Five: Simultaneous special sessions

    Simultaneous special sessions Session 1 Nuclear dangers in the Asia-Pacific  Session 2 New patterns of security cooperation Session 3 Defence implications of emerging technologies  Session 4 Practical measures to avoid conflict at sea
  • Chapter Seven: Finding common ground on regional security

    General (Retd) Ryamizard Ryacudu, Minister of Defense, Indonesia, began the first address in the session by stressing the importance of the Shangri-La Dialogue as a defence diplomacy forum in which participating countries can debate and develop solutions for common challenges to peace and stability in the region. The minister pointed to the broad spectrum of security risks and threats countries had to address, including terrorism and radicalism, separatism and armed...
  • Chapter Eight: Global threats and regional security

    The final plenary session provided an opportunity to connect the threads of previous discussions, and opened with a presentation by New Zealand’s Defence Minister, Mark Mitchell. He started by suggesting that multinational efforts optimised responses to global threats. He then observed that localised conventional challenges were no longer the norm, given the rising salience of North Korea’s nuclear and missile activity, transnational violent extremism and digital interconnectedness. Cyber capabilities have...
  • Chapter Nine: The Southeast Asian Young Leaders’ Programme

    The Southeast Asian Young Leaders’ Programme (SEAYLP) at the 2017 Shangri-La Dialogue built and expanded on the success of an inaugural event organised in conjunction with the previous year’s Dialogue, convening 36 enthusiastic young leaders, almost half of them female, from ten Southeast Asian and four other countries. Reflecting the diversity of the region, these delegates represented key sectors with security interests, including government departments and agencies, the armed forces...
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