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The 15th Asia Security Summit, Singapore, 3–5 June 2016.

  • The IISS Shangri-La Dialogue 2016

    Read The IISS Shangri-La Dialogue 2016 book online or download to your tablet or mobile.
  • Foreword

    The International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) convened its 15th annual Shangri-La Dialogue in Singapore from 3–5 June 2016 and is pleased to present this report, which summarises the Dialogue’s open proceedings, including all plenary and special sessions. The full transcripts of all sessions, including questions and answers, are available on the IISS website. As in previous years, the 2016 Shangri-La Dialogue, which commenced with an important keynote address by Thailand’s...
  • Introduction

    The first IISS Shangri-La Dialogue – originally known as the Asia Security Summit – convened in 2002 in response to the evident need for a forum where defence ministers from the broad Asia-Pacific region, as well as the US and other Western countries with important interests there, could engage in dialogue aimed at building mutual confidence and fostering practical cooperation. Today, the Shangri-La Dialogue remains the only annual meeting for...
  • Chapter One: Keynote address and opening dinner

    Introducing the keynote speaker, Thailand’s Prime Minister General (Retd) Prayut Chan-o-cha, IISS Director-General and Chief Executive Dr John Chipman noted that this leader – who ‘came to politics late in his career’ – and his government had pursued policies aimed at radically reforming their country’s political scene since they came to power in 2014. The audience at the Shangri-La Hotel was fortunate, said Chipman, to have had the chance to...
  • Chapter Two: Meeting Asia’s complex security challenges

    In the Dialogue’s first plenary session, on the morning of 4 June, US Secretary of Defense Dr Ashton Carter spoke on the theme ‘Meeting Asia’s complex security challenges’. Carter noted the ‘historic change’ underway in the Asia-Pacific, most of which was positive: ‘country after country is seeking to play a greater role in regional affairs, and that is for the good’. However, he also highlighted ‘tensions in the South China...
  • Chapter Three: Managing military competition in Asia

    Opening the second plenary session, India’s Minister of Defence, Manohar Parrikar, observed that Asia-Pacific countries were spending more on defence, and noted that some states were catching up after prolonged neglect of their defence budgets. In other countries, increased defence spending reflected new challenges and roles for the armed forces. Parrikar distinguished between low-probability, high-risk traditional security threats and continuous non-traditional threats that range in impact from the negligible to...
  • Chapter Four: Making defence policy in uncertain times

    In the third plenary session, Indonesia’s Minister of Defense, General (Retd) Ryamizard Ryacudu, opened by arguing that with every country facing more complex and more dynamic security challenges than in the past, a coordinated response was necessary. The terrorist threat had taken on a new dimension, he said, with ISIS turning from a regional militia in Iraq and Syria into a transnational threat. The minister warned that ISIS might inspire...
  • Chapter Five: Simultaneous special sessions

    Simultaneous special sessions Session 1 Containing the North Korean threat Session 2 Military capability development: new technologies, limited budgets and hard choices Session 3 The security challenges of irregular migration Session 4 Enhancing cooperation against jihadi terrorism in Asia Session 5 Managing South China Sea tensions Session 6 Identifying common security interests in the cyber-domain
  • Chapter Seven: The challenges of conflict resolution

    As first speaker in the fourth plenary session, French Minister of Defence Jean-Yves Le Drian said that for him the question of security in the Asia-Pacific was not a theoretical issue, but a concrete concern. France’s 11m square kilometre Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), of which 85% lies in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, houses more than 1.6m French citizens and a permanent 8,000-strong French military presence. According to Le Drian...
  • Chapter Eight: Pursuing common security objectives

    Opening the fifth plenary session, Canada’s Minister of National Defence Harjit Singh Sajjan said that relationships based on principles served not only the interests of Canada but those of the entire world. He stressed that Canada was very much a Pacific nation, both in terms of its geography and the make-up of its people. This was the rationale for Canada’s commitment to increasing its engagement in the Asia-Pacific region. In...
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