Adelphi Books

The International Institute for Strategic Studies is an independent centre for research, information and debate on the problems of conflict, however caused, that have, or potentially have, an important military content. The Council and Staff of the Institute are international and its membership is drawn from almost 100 countries. The Institute is independent and it alone decides what activities to conduct. It owes no allegiance to any government, any group of governments or any political or other organisation. The IISS stresses rigorous research with a forward-looking policy orientation and places particular emphasis on bringing new perspectives to the strategic debate. The Institute’s publications are designed to meet the needs of a wider audience than its own membership and are available on subscription, by mail order and in good bookshops. Further details at www.iiss.org. acknowledgements This book project started when I was a journalist at the Singapore Straits Times. From my front-row seat, I realised that there was a combustible mix at work in the Sino-Japanese relationship. While the controversial history of the two countries was the fuel, the dispute over the Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands was the spark. This Adelphi is the result. I want to thank the scholars and analysts who, over a cup of coffee, ramen or jiaozi, have shared their inputs and insights with me. They include Mou Hong, Yuichi Hosoya, Hu Hao, Hu Jiping, Li Quoqiang, Liu Jiangyong, Eiichi Katahara, Yasuhiro Matsuda, Narushige Michishita, Cen Song, Akio Takahara, Cao Qun, Wang Dong and Wang Xiaowei. A note of special thanks should go to Stephanie Kleine-Ahlbrandt, who regaled me with tales of Sino-Japanese amity and animosity over a bowl of laksa (fiery recipe for a fiery tale). Hitoshi Tanaka, with his depth of experience at the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs, was particularly helpful in providing me with a sage introduction into the subject. I also want to thank my former Straits Times colleagues – Kor Kian Beng, Ho Ai Li and Kwan Weng Kin – for opening up their rolodexes prior to my research trip, topped up with the friendly exchange of notes and anecdotes that so marks the tradecraft of journalism. Several officials from various capitals provided critical inputs. For reasons outlined in the first paragraph, they will remain anonymous. At the IISS, I want to thank the gang at the Asia office – Tim Huxley, Alex Neill, Hanna Ucko-Neill, Pierre Noël, Clara Lee, Eva Saddiqui, Katherine Scully and Michelle Chin – for their useful input and understanding when I spent hours holed up in my usual space. A special word of thanks also goes to my colleagues in London – Christian Le Mière, Henry Boyd and James Hackett – for going through the trickier military parts of the manuscript. This work would not have been complete (or have reached completion) without the professional handling of editors Nick Redman and Jeffrey Mazo and Design Manager John Buck. Last but not least, I would like to thank my wife Lay Fong and sons Joseph and Jonathan, whose prayers...

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