Adelphi Books

As economic powers from the developing world, particularly China, have emerged in the past few decades, their weight has altered the balance in the global trading system. This has presented challenges in the World Trade Organisation (WTO), where the Doha Round of multilateral negotiations has dragged on for more than a dozen years. Frustrated by this stalemate, many countries have sought alternatives. Among these are ‘mega-regional’ trade agreements such as the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) between the US and EU, and a 16-member Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).  In this volume, leading commentators – including two former heads of the WTO – examine the possible consequences of this shifting trade landscape. Is globalisation in reverse, and have countries been retreating from liberalisation since the world financial crisis of 2008–09? Are the ‘mega-regional’ deals an existential threat to the WTO regime, or can they be used as building blocks towards wider multilateral agreement on a broad range of issues, from industrial standards to intellectual property rights. And what does it all mean for the balance of geopolitical power between the developed and developing world? “... The big choices in today’s world are between open and closed, multilateralist and nationalist. This excellent series of essays explains how free trade has recast the global geopolitical order and brought prosperity to billions – and offers a powerful warning about the dangers of an unravelling of the multilateral system ...” Philip Stephens, Associate Editor, Financial Times Power Shifts and New Blocs in the Global Trading System will be launched at IISS-US on 10 March 2015. Print copies are available to pre-order and will be dispatched after the launch. UN peacekeepers today do far more than patrol a ceasefire line. In most cases, there is no frontline, no truce, numerous parties and among them some armed groups seeking to undermine a settlement. In short, the UN is attempting to conduct peacekeeping in places where there is no peace to keep. Unfortunately the UN has failed to adequately develop the instruments to identify armed groups, and then deal with the challenge they pose. This book is a policy guide for UN missions. It analyses the nature of non-permissive UN mission environments and argues that the UN should think afresh about its approach to missions in these settings. By embracing and developing three concepts – robust peacekeeping, political processes, and the protection of civilians – the UN can arrive at a stabilisation doctrine. 'This is a timely, thoughtful and carefully researched contribution to the debate on the use of force in UN operations, which, rightly, stresses the vital importance of ensuring that UN military actions sit within a coherent political strategy. Its detailed discussion of the challenges facing UN forces in the field powerfully reinforces this central conclusion.’ Mats Berdal, Professor in the Department of War Studies at King’s College London 'It is a doctrinal military requirement for commanders properly to “understand” the operational environment of any operation in which they might become involved. It is frequently an obligation honoured in the breach. I wish this excellent book had been written before I deployed to East...

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