Discussion Meeting
Steven Pifer, Director, Arms Control Initiative and Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution
Ted Seay, Policy Consultant, British American Security Information Council (BASIC)
Arundel House, London
Wednesday 15 May 2013, 1:30-2:30pm

Steven Piferm Mark Fitzpatrick and Ted Seay

With US-Russia diplomatic relations having taken a downturn since the 2011 ratification of the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (New START), there is no mandate in sight for the next round of strategic negotiations. US National Security Adviser Donilon’s April visit to Moscow was unable to assuage Russian concerns about US and NATO missile defence plans in Europe, which Russia considers a precondition to further strategic reductions.

Ambassador Steven Pifer and Ted Seay addressed the possible next steps in US-Russian nuclear arms reductions. Is another bilateral treaty covering all US and Russia nuclear weapons the way forward? Are there other parallel approaches to address deployed strategic warheads and other nuclear weapons? Can tactical and non-deployed strategic warheads be captured through another arms control framework? Is there a framework that can engage other nuclear powers? 

Pifer and Seay addressed these and other relevant issues to the arms control agenda, including missile defence, long-range conventional strike capabilities and multilateralisation of the arms control process.

Listen to the discussion:



Steven Pifer is director of the Brookings Arms Control Initiative and a senior fellow with the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence and the Center on the United States and Europe in the Foreign Policy program at Brookings. A former ambassador to Ukraine, Pifer’s career as a foreign service officer centred on Europe, the former Soviet Union and arms control. Ambassador Pifer recently co-authored The Opportunity: Next Steps in Reducing Nuclear Arms (Brookings, October 2012).

Ted Seay is a policy consultant with the British American Security Information Council (BASIC) in London. Until his retirement in 2011, he served for 26 years as a US Foreign Service Officer, most recently at the US Mission to NATO as arms control advisor.  Previously, Seay was seconded to the Secretariat of the Wassenaar Arrangement on Export Controls for Conventional Arms and Dual-Use Goods and Technologies in Vienna.  

This meeting was chaired by Mark Fitzpatrick, Director of the Non-proliferation and Disarmament Programme, at the IISS. 

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